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Building Futures —

The country’s only private non-profit masonry school opened its doors in 2005. Since then hundreds of students have learned the fundamentals of masonry and the importance of using their skills in communities. At the Maine School of Masonry students are taught the value of volunteer work. It is important to the curriculum and communities we serve.

The Maine School of Masonry works hand-and-hand with communities throughout the state volunteering to help projects that need our expertise. In exchange our students get experiences putting their trade into action.

As you look around at office buildings, schools, houses, patios, and fireplaces, you will notice that there are many aspects of society where you will see some form of masonry enhancing the atmosphere everywhere.

“This trade is not just to make money, but also to help people,” says the school’s founder Mitch. “Buildings help create the foundations of communities.”

During the year our students have given their talents and time to community projects in Phillips, Farmington, New Sharon, Madrid and Wilton. They’ve left their mark on churches, community buildings and town halls.

Our renovation projects are big community connectors as well.

Renovation Community Work—

All across the country historic buildings are in need of renovation. While the materials for historic renovations are readily available there is a shortage of trained quality craftspeople to do the needed repairs and restoration work.

In partnership with the owners of historic landmarks and with the state’s approval, Mitch and his renovation and preservation students have begun work on restoration and preservation projects at the Kennebec Arsenal, Fort Knox, The Old Wiscasset Jail and Rangeley’s Historical Society.

Renovation work at the Kennebec Arsenal in Augusta—

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Added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970 and designated a National Historic Landmark — one of only 43 in Maine — in 2000, the Kennebec Arsenal remains one of the best and earliest surviving examples of 19th-century munitions depots in the United States.

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Built between 1828-1838, the complex of eight Greek and Gothic Revival granite buildings occupies a commanding location on the east bank of the Kennebec River. Most of the major structures were built out of granite.

The site’s developer, Tom Niemann of Niemann Capitol, has given the school permission to renovate the first North Burleigh building. In the future, students will be able to live on site while working on the project.

Renovation work at Fort Knox along the Penobscot River in Prospect—

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Maine’s largest historic fort, features stunning military architecture and master granite craftsmanship and is the state’s first granite fort. Constructed between 1844 and 1864 this is an unaltered example of a large mid-19th century granite coastal fortification. It is also New England’s finest unmodified specimen of military architecture of the period.

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Maine’s largest historic fort, features stunning military architecture and master granite craftsmanship and is the state’s first granite fort. Constructed between 1844 and 1864 this is an unaltered example of a large mid-19th century granite coastal fortification. It is also New England’s finest unmodified specimen of military architecture of the period.

The Stone Restoration and Preservation course is taught in the autumn and the Brick Restoration and Preservation course is taught in the spring. Together they make a full year advanced program. (APPLICATION FORM)

Giving courses in local schools and to those in need of masonry skills also brings our community together.

Being able to offer new generations a future in an age-old profession is a passion with Mitch who travels to schools throughout the state.

“We give a four-day course on masonry. There is always a demand for skilled masons, anywhere in the world. Once someone is exposed to the profession it can open doors to the future.”

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Maine School of Masonry also attends college and job fairs, gives demonstrations and encourages all who seek to learn the timeless skills of masonry.

Masonry is a skill that cannot be outsourced and we encourage everyone interested to apply.

As a non-profit 501(c)3 private school we have been able to help Veterans through government programs.

  • Full Veteran’s benefits
  • Scholarships are available

Currently, scholarships are available for the Restoration courses to Alumni of Maine School of Masonry Graduates.

We’d like to help more. The art of masonry should not be lost to automation. See how you can help here.